My voice my choice (Leonard Cheshire)

Our My Voice My Choice programme is designed to develop your campaigning and advocacy skills so you’ll be able to make a difference in your local community. We’re running free workshops across Wales. We run three workshops in each of our 12 locations in Wales for disabled people and their allies. Each session will cover a wide range of issues such as hate crime, social inclusion, health and wellbeing – whatever the issues are, we’ll tackle them together.

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Facebook: Connect with Neil Thompson on Facebook

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Spotlight – The Loss and Grief Practice Manual

Coping with a significant loss is one of the most demanding experiences each of us will ever have. Supporting people who are in the throes of grief can also be a highly challenging experience. This manual, with its exemplary blend of theory and practice provides a solid foundation of understanding alongside helpful practice guidance that will be of immense value to members of the caring professions, managers and supervisors and, indeed, anyone called upon to support people on their grief journey.

Available from https://neilthompson.info/shop/ or Amazon

The Professional Social Worker: An essential text for all social workers

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Neil Thompson’s Lessons for Living – Don’t reinvent the wheel

We can so easily become so engrossed in our work and under so much pressure that we don’t look more broadly at the situation we are dealing with. This can mean that we can find ourselves reinventing the wheel – that is, not realizing that it is likely that other people will have faced the type of situation we are in now and will have found helpful ways of responding to it. There is much to be learned from finding out how other people tackle their challenges, but we won’t do any of that learning if we don’t take the trouble to try and find out. If we don’t make that effort, we will be doomed to reinvent the wheel and not learn from other people’s experiences.

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Connect with Neil Thompson online! For Neil's blog and more resources

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Stress in the workplace

Stress can place immense demands on employees’ physical and mental health and affect their behaviour, performance and relationships with colleagues. It’s a major cause of long-term absence from work, and knowing how to manage the factors that can cause work-related stress is key to managing people effectively. Employers should take a systematic approach to identifying the risks of stress, for example by conducting stress risk assessments. This factsheet defines stress and draws the distinction between stress and pressure. It offers information on UK employers’ duties under health and safety law and concludes with guidance on how to deal with stress at work, providing information on prevention, early intervention and stress policies.

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Twitter: Follow Neil Thompson on Twitter

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The changing workplace: Enabling disability-inclusive hybrid working

The Covid-19 pandemic has fundamentally shifted the way in which people work, with a rise in remote and hybrid working. While many workers, businesses and sectors have benefited from changing working practices during the pandemic, disabled people bore the brunt of the pandemic’s economic consequences and experienced higher rates of unemployment and redundancies than non-disabled people.

Just 52.7% of disabled people are in employment, compared with 81% of non-disabled people. A key driver of the disability employment gap is workplace inflexibility. Pre-pandemic, many employers were reluctant to allow remote or hybrid working, even as a reasonable adjustment for disabled workers. However, as the pandemic led to compulsory remote working for most desk-based workers, we are now seeing employer plans change.

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Ensuring every older person is treated with dignity as a unique individual

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Periods of solitude help older adults recharge after socialising

We know that loneliness is dangerous to our physical and mental health. Older people who are lonely are at a higher risk of heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke, as well as dementia. For all these reasons, efforts are being made to find ways to improve older people’s social lives, to help them to meet their fundamental human need to belong.

However, recent work also shows that it’s not a simple case of the more social contact, the better. Periods of solitude bring benefits, too. One of these benefits is that they allow us to ‘recharge’. According to a popular model, our needs for social time and solitude move in opposite directions, like the two ends of a seesaw, and we regulate what we do accordingly. Lunch with a friend, say, is good for our wellbeing, because it meets our need to belong, but it depletes our energy; after lunch, we might then feel a need for some time alone — and this might be especially true for older people, with more limited energy. As that solitude restores our energy, we then feel a growing desire to be sociable again.

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It’s all about people: visit Neil Thompson’s humansolutions website

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The Care of Older People Practice Manual

A key text for challenging ageism and promoting dignified practice. Dr Sue Thompson presents invaluable guidance on how to take care of older people in positive empowering ways that avoid common ageist assumptions and practices. This is an essential guide to good practice in eldercare.

Available from https://neilthompson.info/shop/ or Amazon

The Authentic Leader A new approach to leadership in Neil’s important book.

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Neil Thompson’s Lessons for Living – Cultivate self-awareness

Self-awareness is an important basis for reflective practice. It involves being able to tune in to: (i) what effect you are having on the situation; and (ii) what effect the situation is having on you. When we interact with other people, we become part of that dynamic; we shape the situation to a certain extent, and so we will be in a stronger position to influence that situation in a positive direction if we are aware of what effect our presence and contribution are having. It is also helpful to be aware of what effect the situation is having on us: Are we anxious? Are we rushing? Are we tired? All these things can have a significant bearing on how the interaction develops, so we would do well to be alert to what part they are playing in shaping the dynamic.

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LinkedIn: Connect online & join Neil Thompson’s HUMANSOLUTIONS discussion group

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