Be clear about your goals

When I undertook my management training many years ago we were taught the importance of a ‘strategic’ approach, which meant at all times being clear about what we were trying to achieve – that is, what our strategic goals are. Our strategy, then, is the plan for achieving these goals, hence the term ‘strategic’. At that point I had been a practising social worker for a number of years and, to me, having clarity about what we were trying to achieve was second nature. So, I was surprised when so many of the other students on the course seemed to think that this ideas of a ‘strategic’ approach was something new and exciting.

Since then I have learned that I should not have been surprised by this. I have come to realise that it is not uncommon for people to lack clarity about their goals or how they are going to achieve them. This is because, whether at work or in our private lives, it is so easy to get bogged down with ‘getting on with it’. At home, it can be about making sure the bills get paid and so on – just the day-to-day chores of earning a living and keeping a household going can take up not just a lot of time and effort, but also space in our head. Similarly, at work, just getting through the day and the demands made on us – especially if you work somewhere where demands come at you from different angles – can be enough to fill your diary and your head. This can be especially the case in workplaces cultures that are characterised by a ‘heads down, get on with it’ culture, with little or no room for reflective practice.

While this state of affairs is understandable, it is far from desirable. As the old saying goes, ‘if you don’t know where you are going any road will take you there’. If you are not sure what you are trying to achieve, how do you make informed choices about how to move forward? How do you know whether your time, effort or other resources are being used to best effect? How do you know whether you are wasting your time?

Also, if you are not clear where you are trying to get to, you may well be prey to one or more unscrupulous people manoeuvring you into helping them get where they want to be – that is, they use you by capitalising on your lack of a sense of direction.

There is also the issue of confidence to consider. If we are clear about what we are trying to achieve and this is apparent to the people around us, they are more likely to trust us and have confidence in us – in other words, our credibility will be higher. By contrast, if people get the impression we are drifting, unclear about what we are doing and where we are going, they are likely to have much less faith in us and therefore a lower level of confidence. If we become aware that people have less confidence in us, that can mean that we have less confidence in ourselves and a vicious circle can be created. Contrast that with the confidence boost we can have if we are aware that we have a good level of credibility and people have confidence in us because they know we are clear about where we are trying to get to and how we are going to get there.

And, finally, there is the question of leadership. An effective leader is someone who helps people to understand where they are trying to get to and supports them and inspires them in trying to get there. Having clarity about our own goals, then, can be seen as a feature of ‘self-leadership’ and all the benefits that brings.

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Dr Neil Thompson

About the Author:

Neil Thompson is a writer, trainer and consultant who has published several best-selling textbooks. He edits THE humansolutions BULLETIN, a fortnightly e-zine. For a no cost subscription go to http://www.humansolutions.org/bulletin. He also tutors the online learning community, The Avenue Professional Development Programme: http://www.apdp.org.uk.
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